We are open June 1 through August 22 from 8 am to 6 pm.

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We are open June 1 through August 22 from 8 am to 6 pm.

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Contact Information

Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation P.O. Box 369 Sundance, WY 82729 Telephone: (307) 266-9530

Contact Information

Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation
P.O. Box 369
Sundance, WY 82729

Telephone: (307) 266-9530



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    Check out our Facebook Feed! Like our page so you don't miss current updates.


    Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
    5 hours ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    We are excited to start off a new semester of work on the Vore Buffalo Jump project with an update on our 3D model! In our last post, Erin Kelley described the 3D modeling process up to the generation of the dense cloud. This week, she provides an update describing the process from the point of cleaning the dense cloud to the creation of the final model:

    The dense cloud gave us a lot of extra “noise”, and while we were able to clean most of it out, when we are deleting stray points it is important to remember that we are working in a 3D space. This means before we can delete any points, they need to be isolated from any points we want to keep (for example, points within the crania located behind the ones we want to delete will also be selected and deleted if we aren’t careful). Once the dense cloud has been cleaned, we create the mesh which can appear in a variety of ways depending on how you would like your model to print if you chose to do so. Here we have chosen a solid purple model. The next step is to add texture to make the model more realistic. Texture is presented as color variation and would not appear on the model if you were to print it. Finally, we build in the scale bars from our original photographs, and we have a finished model!

    Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.
    ... See MoreSee Less

    We are excited to start off a new semester of work on the Vore Buffalo Jump project with an update on our 3D model! In our last post, Erin Kelley described the 3D modeling process up to the generation of the dense cloud. This week, she provides an update describing the process from the point of cleaning the dense cloud to the creation of the final model: 

The dense cloud gave us a lot of extra “noise”, and while we were able to clean most of it out, when we are deleting stray points it is important to remember that we are working in a 3D space. This means before we can delete any points, they need to be isolated from any points we want to keep (for example, points within the crania located behind the ones we want to delete will also be selected and deleted if we aren’t careful). Once the dense cloud has been cleaned, we create the mesh which can appear in a variety of ways depending on how you would like your model to print if you chose to do so. Here we have chosen a solid purple model. The next step is to add texture to make the model more realistic. Texture is presented as color variation and would not appear on the model if you were to print it. Finally, we build in the scale bars from our original photographs, and we have a finished model!

Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.Image attachment
    2 weeks ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    University of Wyoming students, the VBJF is seeking applicants for paid internships. The selected scholars will aid in efforts to curate the Vore collection. Apply through the Google Form below by January 16th:
    forms.gle/H1zVTVRXDLEWP1mA6
    ... See MoreSee Less

    University of Wyoming students, the VBJF is seeking applicants for paid internships. The selected scholars will aid in efforts to curate the Vore collection. Apply through the Google Form below by January 16th:
https://forms.gle/H1zVTVRXDLEWP1mA6

    Comment on Facebook

    Hutch Thompson

    1 month ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    This week, Erin Kelley and Aubrey Edwards shared how they have generated a photogrammetry model from the Vore crania photographed in late November: To create a 3D model, we start by uploading all the photos we took to a program called MetaShape all in the order we took them. We then add a mask (which is a special setting that obscures background “noise,” such as the platform the artifact sits on, the photography equipment, and anything else that surrounds the artifact that we do not want in the model) to approximately eight of these photos. This helps the program recognize what we want to model and what we want to cut out. Once everything is masked, we set the program to align all of our photos, creating thousands of tie points that connect each photo to make the model. This can take anywhere from 10 minutes to 2 hours. Once aligned, MetaShape generates a Sparse Cloud of points that resemble the skull (Photo 2). After the sparse cloud is cleaned, we generate the Dense Cloud (Photo 3). This is where we start to get a full model, but we still have to remove some noise and make sure that all substantial parts of the model have been filled-in and all holes have been carved out. We next create the “mesh” that can be used to print a replica on a 3D printer. During this step, we also build in scale bars so the artifact can be measured and useful for researchers. The final step is to add texture. We will share the final model with you next week! The final 3D models from the Vore collection will be stored on a University of Wyoming Coe Library online server and will be available for members of the public to view and use for research and outreach purposes. Once this server is set up, we will share directions on how to use it.
    Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.
    ... See MoreSee Less

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    Send us a message. Fill out the form and click on the submit button.


      Check out our Facebook Feed! Like our page so you don't miss current updates.


      Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
      5 hours ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      We are excited to start off a new semester of work on the Vore Buffalo Jump project with an update on our 3D model! In our last post, Erin Kelley described the 3D modeling process up to the generation of the dense cloud. This week, she provides an update describing the process from the point of cleaning the dense cloud to the creation of the final model:

      The dense cloud gave us a lot of extra “noise”, and while we were able to clean most of it out, when we are deleting stray points it is important to remember that we are working in a 3D space. This means before we can delete any points, they need to be isolated from any points we want to keep (for example, points within the crania located behind the ones we want to delete will also be selected and deleted if we aren’t careful). Once the dense cloud has been cleaned, we create the mesh which can appear in a variety of ways depending on how you would like your model to print if you chose to do so. Here we have chosen a solid purple model. The next step is to add texture to make the model more realistic. Texture is presented as color variation and would not appear on the model if you were to print it. Finally, we build in the scale bars from our original photographs, and we have a finished model!

      Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.
      ... See MoreSee Less

      We are excited to start off a new semester of work on the Vore Buffalo Jump project with an update on our 3D model! In our last post, Erin Kelley described the 3D modeling process up to the generation of the dense cloud. This week, she provides an update describing the process from the point of cleaning the dense cloud to the creation of the final model: 

The dense cloud gave us a lot of extra “noise”, and while we were able to clean most of it out, when we are deleting stray points it is important to remember that we are working in a 3D space. This means before we can delete any points, they need to be isolated from any points we want to keep (for example, points within the crania located behind the ones we want to delete will also be selected and deleted if we aren’t careful). Once the dense cloud has been cleaned, we create the mesh which can appear in a variety of ways depending on how you would like your model to print if you chose to do so. Here we have chosen a solid purple model. The next step is to add texture to make the model more realistic. Texture is presented as color variation and would not appear on the model if you were to print it. Finally, we build in the scale bars from our original photographs, and we have a finished model!

Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.Image attachment
      2 weeks ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      University of Wyoming students, the VBJF is seeking applicants for paid internships. The selected scholars will aid in efforts to curate the Vore collection. Apply through the Google Form below by January 16th:
      forms.gle/H1zVTVRXDLEWP1mA6
      ... See MoreSee Less

      University of Wyoming students, the VBJF is seeking applicants for paid internships. The selected scholars will aid in efforts to curate the Vore collection. Apply through the Google Form below by January 16th:
https://forms.gle/H1zVTVRXDLEWP1mA6

      Comment on Facebook

      Hutch Thompson

      1 month ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      This week, Erin Kelley and Aubrey Edwards shared how they have generated a photogrammetry model from the Vore crania photographed in late November: To create a 3D model, we start by uploading all the photos we took to a program called MetaShape all in the order we took them. We then add a mask (which is a special setting that obscures background “noise,” such as the platform the artifact sits on, the photography equipment, and anything else that surrounds the artifact that we do not want in the model) to approximately eight of these photos. This helps the program recognize what we want to model and what we want to cut out. Once everything is masked, we set the program to align all of our photos, creating thousands of tie points that connect each photo to make the model. This can take anywhere from 10 minutes to 2 hours. Once aligned, MetaShape generates a Sparse Cloud of points that resemble the skull (Photo 2). After the sparse cloud is cleaned, we generate the Dense Cloud (Photo 3). This is where we start to get a full model, but we still have to remove some noise and make sure that all substantial parts of the model have been filled-in and all holes have been carved out. We next create the “mesh” that can be used to print a replica on a 3D printer. During this step, we also build in scale bars so the artifact can be measured and useful for researchers. The final step is to add texture. We will share the final model with you next week! The final 3D models from the Vore collection will be stored on a University of Wyoming Coe Library online server and will be available for members of the public to view and use for research and outreach purposes. Once this server is set up, we will share directions on how to use it.
      Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.
      ... See MoreSee Less

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