We are open June 1 through August 22 from 8 am to 6 pm.

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We are open June 1 through August 22 from 8 am to 6 pm.

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Contact Information

Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation P.O. Box 369 Sundance, WY 82729 Telephone: (307) 266-9530

Contact Information

Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation
P.O. Box 369
Sundance, WY 82729

Telephone: (307) 266-9530



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    Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
    2 weeks ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    Restoring a Hidden Piece of History within the Black Hills National Forest ... See MoreSee Less

    1 month ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    It was 50 years ago this summer that the Vore Site was first excavated. These photos were published in The Sundance Times in August of 1971. ... See MoreSee Less

    It was 50 years ago this summer that the Vore Site was first excavated. These photos were published in The Sundance Times in August of 1971.Image attachment

    Comment on Facebook

    We enjoyed visiting there!

    2 months ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    No, don't pet the red dogs!Can I pet that dawg?⁣

    No. Bison calves tend to be born from late March through May and are orange-red in color, earning them the nickname "red dogs." After a few months, their hair starts to change to dark brown and their characteristic shoulder hump and horns begin to grow. Like all wild animals, bison can be dangerous and unpredictable. They are capable of charging and bringing pain who approach too closely. An indicator that a bison may be about to charge is the position of its tail: if it's standing straight up, it's a serious watch-out situation. As with all wildlife, it's important to observe them from a distance.⁣ And don’t pet that dawg.

    Find more wildlife tips at www.nps.gov/subjects/watchingwildlife

    Image: An adult bison surrounded by three calves “red dogs” standing in the grass at Yellowstone National Park. NPS⁣
    ... See MoreSee Less

    No, dont pet the red dogs!

    Comment on Facebook

    I was just talking about this place to friends who are heading west in their RV. I visited in 2014.

    red dawg is a really rude and ignorant term. they are the next generation, so vital to the survival of the bison. show some respect

    3 months ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    The VBJF Board would like to thank area archaeologists for volunteering their time on Saturday to clean up the bone bed at the Vore Site. Looks great! Special thanks to our advisory board member Jena Rizzi for organizing. ... See MoreSee Less

    The VBJF Board would like to thank area archaeologists for volunteering their time on Saturday to clean up the bone bed at the Vore Site. Looks great! Special thanks to our advisory board member Jena Rizzi for organizing.Image attachment
    3 months ago
    Vore Buffalo Jump

    This is Molly Herron's final post before she is off on a dig for the summer. The VBJF Board extends our thanks to Molly for all her hard work this semester and for sharing with us all! Here is Molly's post:

    My how the time flies when you are trying to catalog the remains of around 22,000 bison! The spring semester at the University of Wyoming has finished, and the curation technicians who were working on the Vore collection have all run off to different survey and excavation projects around Wyoming and Alaska! (Unfortunately, I forgot to get a picture of the crew together before we scattered to the wind!) Although the summer means that work on the Vore collection is coming to a pause, we are excited to be bringing on more technicians and interns for the fall semester!

    This semester, we cleaned, cataloged, and curated enough bison bones to fill fifty new boxes! We have entirely cataloged everything collected from 1996 and on into the 2000s. We are officially working on bones collected in the 1970s and the early 1990s! We have also cleaned, consolidated, and curated twenty bison crania (not all pictured). Additionally, we learned how to make 3D photogrammetry models and custom curation quality boxes for permanent storage. Finally, we are working on rectifying our database with the original lab files field and lab files.

    After the work this semester, we have completely cataloged and curated about 15-20% of the whole of the Vore collection, and with additional help in the fall, we should continue plugging along to ensure that this unique legacy collection is preserved and available for researchers and interested members of the public alike!

    I want to extend a special thank you to all of the followers of the Vore Buffalo Jump Facebook page, the members of the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation (especially Jacqueline Wyatt), the members of the Office of the Wyoming State Archaeologist (OWSA), and everyone who is interested in this site and the amazing collection that accompanies it!

    Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.
    ... See MoreSee Less

    This is Molly Herrons final post before she is off on a dig for the summer. The VBJF Board extends our thanks to Molly for all her hard work this semester and for sharing with us all! Here is Mollys post: 

My how the time flies when you are trying to catalog the remains of around 22,000 bison! The spring semester at the University of Wyoming has finished, and the curation technicians who were working on the Vore collection have all run off to different survey and excavation projects around Wyoming and Alaska! (Unfortunately, I forgot to get a picture of the crew together before we scattered to the wind!) Although the summer means that work on the Vore collection is coming to a pause, we are excited to be bringing on more technicians and interns for the fall semester! 

This semester, we cleaned, cataloged, and curated enough bison bones to fill fifty new boxes! We have entirely cataloged everything collected from 1996 and on into the 2000s. We are officially working on bones collected in the 1970s and the early 1990s! We have also cleaned, consolidated, and curated twenty bison crania (not all pictured). Additionally, we learned how to make 3D photogrammetry models and custom curation quality boxes for permanent storage. Finally, we are working on rectifying our database with the original lab files field and lab files. 

After the work this semester, we have completely cataloged and curated about 15-20% of the whole of the Vore collection, and with additional help in the fall, we should continue plugging along to ensure that this unique legacy collection is preserved and available for researchers and interested members of the public alike! 

I want to extend a special thank you to all of the followers of the Vore Buffalo Jump Facebook page, the members of the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation (especially Jacqueline Wyatt), the members of the Office of the Wyoming State Archaeologist (OWSA), and everyone who is interested in this site and the amazing collection that accompanies it! 

Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.Image attachmentImage attachment

    Comment on Facebook

    I have appreciated Molly and her team's sharing so many interesting aspects of her studies. I am certain we have all gained a new respect for the hard work. Thank you !

    I visited the Vore site approximately twenty years ago when a colleague and I participated in the excavation of the Donovan Site led by Professor Charles Reher. I follow your research with the bison bones with joy.

    Wow I just posted something here about a buffalo lower jawbone I believe I found eroding out of the side of the bank of chugwater Creek right below the cliffs. I was looking for something to do with it or someone who would I have a use for it rather than me just letting it right away and never doing nothing with it would it be something that you're interested in? Obviously I would be just donating it I'm not looking for anything for it I just would like to help out the cause

    We are coming to the site in August.

    Incredible!! What an amazing contribution to the documentation of the Vore site!!

    We visited the site last week from East Tennessee. Absolutely amazing.

    Thank you!

    Great job Molly and co.

    Great work, a big thank you to Molly and team

    View more comments

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    Send us a message. Fill out the form and click on the submit button.


      Check out our Facebook Feed! Like our page so you don't miss current updates.


      Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
      2 weeks ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      Restoring a Hidden Piece of History within the Black Hills National Forest ... See MoreSee Less

      1 month ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      It was 50 years ago this summer that the Vore Site was first excavated. These photos were published in The Sundance Times in August of 1971. ... See MoreSee Less

      It was 50 years ago this summer that the Vore Site was first excavated. These photos were published in The Sundance Times in August of 1971.Image attachment

      Comment on Facebook

      We enjoyed visiting there!

      2 months ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      No, don't pet the red dogs!Can I pet that dawg?⁣

      No. Bison calves tend to be born from late March through May and are orange-red in color, earning them the nickname "red dogs." After a few months, their hair starts to change to dark brown and their characteristic shoulder hump and horns begin to grow. Like all wild animals, bison can be dangerous and unpredictable. They are capable of charging and bringing pain who approach too closely. An indicator that a bison may be about to charge is the position of its tail: if it's standing straight up, it's a serious watch-out situation. As with all wildlife, it's important to observe them from a distance.⁣ And don’t pet that dawg.

      Find more wildlife tips at www.nps.gov/subjects/watchingwildlife

      Image: An adult bison surrounded by three calves “red dogs” standing in the grass at Yellowstone National Park. NPS⁣
      ... See MoreSee Less

      No, dont pet the red dogs!

      Comment on Facebook

      I was just talking about this place to friends who are heading west in their RV. I visited in 2014.

      red dawg is a really rude and ignorant term. they are the next generation, so vital to the survival of the bison. show some respect

      3 months ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      The VBJF Board would like to thank area archaeologists for volunteering their time on Saturday to clean up the bone bed at the Vore Site. Looks great! Special thanks to our advisory board member Jena Rizzi for organizing. ... See MoreSee Less

      The VBJF Board would like to thank area archaeologists for volunteering their time on Saturday to clean up the bone bed at the Vore Site. Looks great! Special thanks to our advisory board member Jena Rizzi for organizing.Image attachment
      3 months ago
      Vore Buffalo Jump

      This is Molly Herron's final post before she is off on a dig for the summer. The VBJF Board extends our thanks to Molly for all her hard work this semester and for sharing with us all! Here is Molly's post:

      My how the time flies when you are trying to catalog the remains of around 22,000 bison! The spring semester at the University of Wyoming has finished, and the curation technicians who were working on the Vore collection have all run off to different survey and excavation projects around Wyoming and Alaska! (Unfortunately, I forgot to get a picture of the crew together before we scattered to the wind!) Although the summer means that work on the Vore collection is coming to a pause, we are excited to be bringing on more technicians and interns for the fall semester!

      This semester, we cleaned, cataloged, and curated enough bison bones to fill fifty new boxes! We have entirely cataloged everything collected from 1996 and on into the 2000s. We are officially working on bones collected in the 1970s and the early 1990s! We have also cleaned, consolidated, and curated twenty bison crania (not all pictured). Additionally, we learned how to make 3D photogrammetry models and custom curation quality boxes for permanent storage. Finally, we are working on rectifying our database with the original lab files field and lab files.

      After the work this semester, we have completely cataloged and curated about 15-20% of the whole of the Vore collection, and with additional help in the fall, we should continue plugging along to ensure that this unique legacy collection is preserved and available for researchers and interested members of the public alike!

      I want to extend a special thank you to all of the followers of the Vore Buffalo Jump Facebook page, the members of the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation (especially Jacqueline Wyatt), the members of the Office of the Wyoming State Archaeologist (OWSA), and everyone who is interested in this site and the amazing collection that accompanies it!

      Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.
      ... See MoreSee Less

      This is Molly Herrons final post before she is off on a dig for the summer. The VBJF Board extends our thanks to Molly for all her hard work this semester and for sharing with us all! Here is Mollys post: 

My how the time flies when you are trying to catalog the remains of around 22,000 bison! The spring semester at the University of Wyoming has finished, and the curation technicians who were working on the Vore collection have all run off to different survey and excavation projects around Wyoming and Alaska! (Unfortunately, I forgot to get a picture of the crew together before we scattered to the wind!) Although the summer means that work on the Vore collection is coming to a pause, we are excited to be bringing on more technicians and interns for the fall semester! 

This semester, we cleaned, cataloged, and curated enough bison bones to fill fifty new boxes! We have entirely cataloged everything collected from 1996 and on into the 2000s. We are officially working on bones collected in the 1970s and the early 1990s! We have also cleaned, consolidated, and curated twenty bison crania (not all pictured). Additionally, we learned how to make 3D photogrammetry models and custom curation quality boxes for permanent storage. Finally, we are working on rectifying our database with the original lab files field and lab files. 

After the work this semester, we have completely cataloged and curated about 15-20% of the whole of the Vore collection, and with additional help in the fall, we should continue plugging along to ensure that this unique legacy collection is preserved and available for researchers and interested members of the public alike! 

I want to extend a special thank you to all of the followers of the Vore Buffalo Jump Facebook page, the members of the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation (especially Jacqueline Wyatt), the members of the Office of the Wyoming State Archaeologist (OWSA), and everyone who is interested in this site and the amazing collection that accompanies it! 

Research of the Vore collection is funded in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and in part by donations from supporters to the Vore Buffalo Jump Foundation.Image attachmentImage attachment

      Comment on Facebook

      I have appreciated Molly and her team's sharing so many interesting aspects of her studies. I am certain we have all gained a new respect for the hard work. Thank you !

      I visited the Vore site approximately twenty years ago when a colleague and I participated in the excavation of the Donovan Site led by Professor Charles Reher. I follow your research with the bison bones with joy.

      Wow I just posted something here about a buffalo lower jawbone I believe I found eroding out of the side of the bank of chugwater Creek right below the cliffs. I was looking for something to do with it or someone who would I have a use for it rather than me just letting it right away and never doing nothing with it would it be something that you're interested in? Obviously I would be just donating it I'm not looking for anything for it I just would like to help out the cause

      We are coming to the site in August.

      Incredible!! What an amazing contribution to the documentation of the Vore site!!

      We visited the site last week from East Tennessee. Absolutely amazing.

      Thank you!

      Great job Molly and co.

      Great work, a big thank you to Molly and team

      View more comments

      Load more